Most Important Events Concerning Mental Health Services as the FY 2020 Budget Was Completed in April-May 2019

April 1, 2019

Two key budget resolutions introduced

On April 1, 2019, Council members reacted to the continuing controversy over the use of the Mental Health and Public Safety Millage funds.  The controversy intensified after March 25 because the City Survey showed support for mental health services than climate change actions.  In addition, Council members needed to act on April 1 in order to give direction to the City Administrator as he constructed his recommended budget to be delivered to Council on April 15.

 

Mayor Taylor and Council Member Griswold introduced a resolution specifying minimum dollar amounts for affordable housing, climate change actions, and pedestrian and bicycle safety.  These minimums equalled the allocations of the intent resolution specifying 40-40-20 percentages of the Millage funds.  The important feature, in the opinion of Taylor and Griswold, was the resolution did not specify the use of the Millage funds.  They hoped this would lead to support by a large majority of the Council.  Some Council members felt there was no substantive difference between the dollar amounts and the percentages.  The resolution was approved by a 7-4 vote.

 

Council Member Lumm introduced a resolution specifying an allocation of the Millage funds consistent with the preferences revealed in the City survey.  Council Member Ackerman proposed an amendment, accepted as friendly, that deleted the allocations for affordable housing, climate change actions, and pedestrian and bicycle safety because a majority had agreed to the figures in the Taylor/Griswold resolution.  Mayor Taylor objected strongly to the resolution because it allocated Millage funds to areas other than affordable housing, climate change actions, and pedestrian and bicycle safety.  He indicated much of his concern would disappear if the source of the funds was not explicit.  The resolution was approved by a 7-4 vote.

April 5, 2019

Mayor Taylor vetoed the Lumm Resolution of April 1

Mayor Taylor vetoed the resolution introduced by Council Member Lumm and approved by the Council on April 1.  In his veto letter (click on the link in this source) he reasserted his objection to the allocation of Millage funds to areas other than affordable housing, climate change actions, and pedestrian and bicycle safety.  He wrote that he had been assured by the City Administrator that the allocations in the vetoed resolution would be included in the Administrator’s recommended budget — but not drawn from the Millage fund.

April 15, 2019

Council voted 7-4 in favor of overriding the Mayor's veto - one short of the required 8 votes; click here for the vote of individual Council Members

April 15, 2019

City Administrator's Recommended Budget included funding for mental health services

The City Administrator included $349,800 for mental health services in his recommended budget.  This figure was consistent with the Lumm resolution passed on April 1 and vetoed on April 5.  The allocation did not violate Mayor Taylor’s veto of April 5 because the funds came from the General Fund rather than the Mental Health and Public Safety Millage.  The allocation included

  • $300,000 for support services for residents in Ann Arbor Housing Assistance (AAHA) facilities

  • $24,900 to the Ann Arbor Police Department (AAPD) for Crisis Intervention Assistance and Stabilization Services

  • $24,900 for Youth Outreach and Engagement

May 20, 2019

City Council adopted the budget with no new mental health amendments

The City Council unanimously adopted (Smith absent) the FY 2020 Budget on May 20, 2019.  The provisions affecting mental health services were unchanged from those in the City Administrator’s Recommended Budget.

Paid for with regulated funds by Citizens for Mental Health & Public Safety

PO Box 4055, Ann Arbor, MI 48106-4055

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